Another Transportation Strike in Italy

Today there was another strike affecting public transportation in Italy. This was in protest of the Italian government’s position on a $63 billion austerity program, which has been met with much controversy. Organized by the labor unions, strikes or scioperi are common in Italy, and usually affect the transportation system for a limited time period.

National Strike Shuts Down Transportation System in Italy

This 8 hour strike closed down the majority of the buses and the entire metro system in Rome, Naples and Torino. Two hundred airline flights had to be cancelled, as well as half of the country’s train connections. The Colosseum and Roman Forum were closed to tourists and many travelers were left stranded looking for other transportation options.

I did not have to directly deal with any strikes during my time in Italy this spring, although I did just make it back to Siena one day an hour before a bus strike began. Usually these strikes are announced in advance although all tourists are not so aware of this issue. Even if they are, they can throw a monkey wrench into someone’s travel plans.

On my first trip to Italy in 2007, there was a taxi strike in Rome on the day I had to leave. I was there with my brother and sister-in-law, and we had the fun experience of dragging our luggage in the rain for five blocks or more to the metro station. Of course we were not smart enough to pack light so we looked ridiculous negotiating the crowded cobble-stoned streets of via del Corso with all our gear.

At least after that experience, I learned to travel with one bag when going to Italy.

This entry was posted in Italian lifestyle and culture, Italy News, Italy Travel and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to Another Transportation Strike in Italy

  1. Bonnie D. says:

    The way I understand it is that Italy has no choice but to adopt the austerity measures or get the boot from the EU. The reason that is so imortant is that the EU (read Germany) is supporting their debt load to keep them from defaulting on loans (wonder if the EU will help us with our debt load?). roflol At any rate, not only would they default they also would not be able to borrow any more money to cover the payments due out to cover all their social programs. It is sad but true. The world is facing a Depression; no matter what they want to call it. Pray for the elderly, they are going to be thrown on the mercy of their children. Hmmmm

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s