Sicily Travel – The Palermo Cathedral

September 22, 2013 Sunday

DSCN3222 (640x479)Our last day in Palermo and Rick, Monica, and I decided to walk to  the Palermo Cathedral that we had passed on the bus. This stunning landmark is one of Sicily’s many buildings which portray mixes of different architectural styles.  Due to rebuilding many times, the Duomo features designs of Norman, Gothic, Byzantine, Arab, Swabian (from Germany), romanesque, and baroque influence.

DSCN3219 (480x640)The original cathedral was built in the twelfth century over the site of a Christian basilica, and then later, a mosque. The baroque-style cupola was added in the late 1700’s.

DSCN3224 (481x640)DSCN3225 (640x518)The interior was impressive, and it was fortunate that we arrived before Mass started or I would not be able to take photos during  a service.

DSCN3231 (480x640)DSCN3232 (481x640)I particularly liked the paintings on the arched ceilings over the front altar.

DSCN3234 (480x640)The side altars were elaborate with marble in every color, like many churches in Italy.

DSCN3239 (640x480)Confessionals made from wood line the sides of the church. These always impress me in that they are separate pieces of furniture and immense.

DSCN3241 (478x640)DSCN3244 (480x640)For much more detail about this Palermo Cathedral, also known as Saint Mary of the Assumption, Best of Sicily has a wonderful article.

This entry was posted in Italian lifestyle and culture, Italy Photo, Italy Travel, Photography, Writing and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Sicily Travel – The Palermo Cathedral

  1. imarancher says:

    Long before museums the Catholic Church was the collector of all things beautiful for the glory of God. I doubt the museums of this world can match the bling of the average Cathedral. Just gorgeous works of art that ought to be preserved for all the people who come after us. You don’t have to be Catholic or religious at all to appreciate this beauty. On the other hand, it is nearly impossible not to be impressed with what God has wrought, especially in a Cathedral of this magnitude.

    Like

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