Getting to Sorrento by Way of Pompeii

Sept 24, 2013

I am on my own today since Rick and Monica don’t feel that great and want to hang out in Salerno and at the hotel.

DSCN3346 (640x479)After breakfast, all of us ride together on the shuttle to Salerno and I go to the train station to purchase a ticket to Pompeii. From there, I will have to take another train, the local Circumvesuviana, to Sorrento. I could have taken a ferry to Amalfi, and another ferry from there, but Giuseppe at the hotel desk recommended the trains.

I am on the platform waiting for my train, which is delayed.  After the delay time continues to be extended, I decide to see if another train will take me to Pompeii, and yes, there is another one, so I look for that platform and wait. Eventually I realize that I am on the wrong platform and move to the correct one and am happy to see the train already there.

I settle in to my seat, and moments later a conductor informs all of the passengers that we have to move to another train. Finally, over an hour past the original train departure time I am on my way.

I have plans to meet Tina today in Sorrento, so I call to inform that I am running late because of the train delays.  I have only met Tina on Twitter but she operates Discover Napoli Destinations and offered to take me to a place in Sorrento, known for a special type of biscotti.

DSCN3348 (640x480)Once I arrive in Pompeii, I go to the ticket window to purchase my ticket for Sorrento and I learn that I need to go to a different Pompeii train station, two km down the road. I can’t believe my luck, or lack thereof! So, to save time, I figure I will take a taxi to the train station. Several taxi drivers are hanging around so I assume all is good.

Unfortunately my bad luck continues. “Oh we have a big problem,” one says in English.
“What kind of problem?” I ask.
“There is a train strike now, for four hours. No trains until five o’clock.”
I could not believe this, and said, “What? Are you kidding me?”

Italy is a place where unannounced limited-time scioperi dei treni, train strikes occur frequently. I wondered why the ticket seller didn’t tell me about it.  So I called Tina again, and she advised me to inquire about a bus to Sorrento. I went inside to ask, and of course, with my luck today, there is no bus to Sorrento from here.  One of those situations of “you can’t get there from here.” At this point I have strong doubts that I will ever make it to Sorrento today.

DSCN3349 (640x480)Even more frustrated, I called Tina, and she surprised me when she said, “I am coming to get you. Just wait there and I will be there in about forty minutes.” I could not get over the fact that a woman I don’t even know is coming to my rescue with her car! She must be a saint. Thank you, Tina.

In the meantime, another taxi driver who speaks very good English approaches me and informs me that there is no srike, and that those men lied to me. He assures me that I can catch a train to Sorrento now.

Pompeii Bell Tower

Pompeii Bell Tower

“It’s too late now. A friend is coming for me,” I said. Besides, at this point I don’t know who to trust. So we carry on a conversation and he even provides me with a map of Pompeii.  Later the original taxi driver returns and now informs me that the strike is over and the trains are running again. What is wrong with this picture?

Just before 2pm this angel from heaven  named Tina arrives in her car, and I am so grateful. I was thrilled to see her, after all the chaos. She was wonderful! This amazing woman whom I never met, was my savior today, rescuing me from a frustrating situation in Italy.

Stay tuned for Part 2 of my day in Sorrento with Tina.
Hint – It is the best part of the day!

This entry was posted in Italian lifestyle and culture, Italy Travel, Italy Travel Planning, Writing and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

11 Responses to Getting to Sorrento by Way of Pompeii

  1. Jen Leslie says:

    Guess you threw a wrench in the taxi driver’s plans! Yeah, for Tina! Your pictures are so clear. Bellisima!

    Like

  2. Debra Kolkka says:

    These dramas seem to happen a lot in Italy.

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  3. I love the fact that everything is an adventure. How boring life would be if everything ran smoothly all the time!

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  4. adinparadise says:

    Now you’ve reminded me of that very moving song, “Come back to Sorrento.” I had to quickly go to YouTube to listen to Pavarotti sing it. 🙂 What a frustrating time you had, Margie, but Tina saved the day. I can see nothing wrong with your picture except for those pesky power lines I was talking about, a couple of days ago. 😕

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  5. imarancher says:

    An adventure every day what better way to enjoy life?

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  6. Margie, did you ever go through the grind! I had a similar experience in Chiusi where the train just sat there. We were told that it wasn’t moving because of a strike, but thought it would in an hour or two. We drug our rolling suitcases off and rambled down some alleys to a restaurant. Turned out it was the best thing! Met two couples from the U.S. and ate with them. By time we got back to train, we barely made it before it left!

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  7. Pingback: Why I Want to Visit Naples, Italy | margieinitaly

  8. Pingback: Meet Tina from Discover Napoli Destinations | margieinitaly

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